WELCOME TO IROKO FINE ART

Windows of The Soul,Phillips Nzekwe
Crushie, I & II, Phillips Nzekwe
Phillips Nzekwe
Obi Nwaegbe
Obi Nwaegbe
Ectasy, Abdulrazaq Ahmed
Drummers, Agboola Adisa
Bello Adedoyin Adelarin
Muse, Bello Adedoyin Adelarin
Staying Behind
My Cro, Bello Adedoyin Adelarin
Bleeding Nation, Bello Adedoyin Adelarin
Behind The Veil, Bello Adedoyin Adelarin
Shy,  Bello Adedoyin Adelarin
Details of Phenomenal Factor
Finding the Rhythm I, Details, Adeola Balogun
Finding the Rhythm II
Finding the Rhythm II, Details, Adeola Balogun
Finding the Rhythm I, Details, Adeola Balogun
Phenomenal Factor, Adeola Balogun
Richmond Ogolo
Who you help; Micheal Adenubi
Micheal Adenubi

Promoters of African and African Diaspora Artists

Iroko Fine Art is a team of international promoters and dealers in modern and contemporary fine art by Black and African artists. We have grown from a small room in London in 2004 to an international platform with links in Abuja and Lagos, Nigeria, Nairobi, Kenya, and London.  Our primary location in the UK means that we have the ability to reach artists and collectors based in some of the most dynamic art metropolises including London, New York, Nairobi and Lagos, famous for their galleries and art movements. We are pleased to welcome artists and collectors from across the world. 

As we have travelled on this journey, we have been faced with a huge dilemma; are we, by operating in a space conceived on ethnicity & race, part of the problem in the marginalisation/appreciation of artworks by these groups of people? Have we inadvertently in creating this platform reinforced the notion of Other? Are we in fact doing more harm than good? To bring about meaningful change we must confront ugly truths, no matter how painful. As promoters, we are acutely aware of the stigma that is attached to the word African especially within Western art markets, the invisible yet seemingly unassailable divide that ensures that art by African artists is lumped together and unable to command the dizzying heights afforded to Western/white art. There is a wild romanticisation of tribal art and simultaneous denigration of African contemporary art. It is uncommon, if not rare, to see black contemporary artists included in Western art auctions, even those artists born and raised in the West.

The Black lives movement has thrown a light on many inequitable practices but there is a real fear that this is a fad and once the movement is no longer in the spotlight, the historic marginalisation of African/Black artists will continue apace.  

Iroko Fine Art is a team of international promoters and dealers in modern and contemporary fine art by Black and African artists. We have grown from a small room in London in 2004 to an international platform with links in Abuja and Lagos, Nigeria, Nairobi, Kenya, and London.  Our primary location in the UK means that we have the ability to reach artists and collectors based in some of the most dynamic art metropolises including London, New York, Nairobi and Lagos, famous for their galleries and art movements. We are pleased to welcome artists and collectors from across the world. 

As we have travelled on this journey, we have been faced with a huge dilemma; are we, by operating in a space conceived on ethnicity & race, part of the problem in the marginalisation/appreciation of artworks by these groups of people? Have we inadvertently in creating this platform reinforced the notion of Other? Are we in fact doing more harm than good? To bring about meaningful change we must confront ugly truths, no matter how painful. As promoters, we are acutely aware of the stigma that is attached to the word African especially within Western art markets, the invisible yet seemingly unassailable divide that ensures that art by African artists is lumped together and unable to command the dizzying heights afforded to Western/white art. There is a wild romanticisation of tribal art and simultaneous denigration of African contemporary art. It is uncommon, if not rare, to see black contemporary artists included in Western art auctions, even those artists born and raised in the West.

The Black lives movement has thrown a light on many inequitable practices but there is a real fear that this is a fad and once the movement is no longer in the spotlight, the historic marginalisation of African/Black artists will continue apace.